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Process Studies & Process Studies Supplements Style Guide

The style guide for Process Studies is the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (6th edition), Ed. Joseph Gibaldi. This style guide is readily available, easy to use, and continually corrected and updated as new forms of documentation are needed. Authors may also use the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing (3rd Edition).

The MLA Style Manual is widely used and summary versions are available in many handbooks and on the World Wide Web. Most of the potential authors for Process Studies will already be familiar with the MLA style guide since it is currently used by over 125 scholarly and literary journals, newsletters, and magazines with circulations over one thousand; by hundreds of smaller periodicals; and by many university and commercial presses. MLA style is commonly followed not only in the United States but in Canada and other countries as well; Japanese and Chinese translations of the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers are available.

SUMMARY

MLA parenthetical text citations

The in-text citations of sources have two requirements:

  • They must include just enough information for the reader to locate the appropriate source in the list of works cited.
  • They must include just enough information for the reader to locate the place in the source where the borrowed material appears.

Usually both requirements are met by providing the author's last name and the page(s) in the source on which the material appears. The reader finds the source in the list of works cited and finds the borrowed material in the source itself.

1. Author not named in the text

One critic concludes that "Whitehead was reacting to modernism, not to postmodernism" (Gilligan 105).

2. Author named in the text

Rousseau, Derrida says, understands writing as a mediate form of speech by making itself "pass for the plenitude of a speech whose deficiency and infirmity it nevertheless only supplements" (144).

These two examples above are the simplest examples and cover the most basic principles.

Assuming Process and Reality was the only work by Whitehead used and listed in the author's Works Cited list, MLA style would require the following:

According to Whitehead, the task of the speculative philosopher is "the endeavour to frame a coherent, logical, necessary system of general ideas in terms of which every element of our experience can be interpreted" (3)

On the other hand, if more than one work by Whitehead is cited and listed in the works cited of this article, there are three alternatives:

1. Author and work named in text

According to Whitehead in Process and Reality, the task of the speculative philosopher is "the endeavour to frame a coherent, logical, necessary system of general ideas in terms of which every element of our experience can be interpreted" (3)

2. Author but no work named in text

According to Whitehead, the task of the speculative philosopher is "the endeavour to frame a coherent, logical, necessary system of general ideas in terms of which every element of our experience can be interpreted" (Process 3)

3. No author or work named in the text

Accordingly, the task of the speculative philosopher is "the endeavour to frame a coherent, logical, necessary system of general ideas in terms of which every element of our experience can be interpreted" (Whitehead, Process 3)

What happens to the Whitehead and Hartshorne acronyms?
Using the MLA style guide eliminates the need to use acronyms for the purpose of citation. In some cases, the acronyms might still be used as shorthand within an essay when citation is not at issue. For example: "The corrected edition of PR has been very useful and MT is still one of Whitehead's most accessible books." However, generally it is preferable to work with complete titles.

Works Cited Page
Creating a list of cited works at the end of an essay is a straightforward matter of following the examples in the MLA style guide (handy versions of the MLA works cited guidelines are reprinted in nearly every compact writing handbook).

What about notes?
Endnotes may be used when commenting on a source or when providing information that does not fit easily in the text. In keeping with MLA guidelines, "If you need to document several sources for a statement, you may cite them in a note to avoid unduly disrupting the text. If you quote more than once from the same page within a single paragraph—and no quotation from another source intervenes—you may give a single parenthetical reference after the last quotation." Notice that MLA style does not require that you include complete bibliographic information in your endnote. Your endnote may refer discursively to books with complete bibliographic information on such books included in the works cited list.

Examples of Works Cited

Allan, George. "God as the Future: On Not Taking Time Seriously." Process Studies 27 (1998): 64-77.

Bracken, Joseph A., S.J. The Divine Matrix. Maryknoll: Orbis, 1995.

--. "Panentheism from a Process Perspective." Trinity in Process: A Relational Theology of God. Ed. Joseph A. Bracken, S.J. and Marjorie Hewitt Suchocki. New York: Continuum, 1997: (95-113).

Cobb, John B., Jr. A Christian Natural Theology. Philadelphia: Westminster, 1965.

Nobo, Jorge Luis. Whitehead's Metaphysics of Extension and Solidarity. Albany: State U of New York P, 1986.

Voskuil, Duane. "Ford/Voskuil" Online posting. Sept. 1999 <http://www.mailbase. ac.uk/lists/process-philosophy/>.

Whitehead, Alfred North. Adventures of Ideas. 1933. New York: Free Press, 1967.

--. Process and Reality. 1929. Corrected Edition, Eds. David Ray Griffin and Donald W. Sherburne. New York: Free Press, 1978.

MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSIONS

Manuscripts should be typed, double-spaced, including references and notes. Use MLA style for citation. An electronic copy should be sent to , Editor.

Manuscripts submitted to Process Sudies will be sent out by the editor to 2 or 3 experts in the topic area in a double-blind assessment process, assuming the editor's first assessment of the manuscripts concludes that the manuscripts are appropriate in content and style for more formal assessment in consideration for publication. Submission of an article is taken to imply that it has not previously been published in English and is not being considered for publication by another journal or as part of a book. Copyright is assigned to Process Studies for published articles. Authors may use their own material in other publications, provided that Process Studies provides permission (through the editor) and the original place of publication is acknowledged. Neither the editor nor the Process Studies journal is responsible for every proposition expressed in the journal and authors retain responsibility for any defamatory or untruthful claim which they may make.

The Editor encourages scholars to propose Special Focus sections on a theme appropriate to Process Studies. Normally, these special focus sections consist of no more than 3 or 4 articles, all of which will be assessed in the same manner as normal manuscripts and limited to 8,000 words each.

Accepted Manuscripts

Manuscripts accepted for publication should be submitted in MSWord or WordPerfect. Recent versions of these programs are required. That is, DOS-based or WINDOWS 3.1 versions of MSWord or WordPerfect are not compatible with our software. Files should be PC based (MAC users should save in PC format on a PC compatible disk). You may save your document as a RTF (Rich Text Format) file with the "save as" feature in your program in order to ensure basic compatibility.

Electronic manuscripts should be minimally formatted. That is, please do not include running headers, page numbers, or non-standard margins. Use standard fonts such as TimesRoman. It is much easier for us, if endnotes are not formatted as notes in your word processor, but simply as additional text at the end of the essay. But if you use the automatic footnote/endnote feature in your word processor, we can strip them out for you.

In general, remember that when we prepare your manuscript for the journal's layout, we will be using page-layout software, and the more "basic" your formatting is, the easier it is for us to cleanly convert it to our layout software.

If you have questions about preparing your electronic manuscript, or if you want to ask about the compatibility of your word processor should you not have Word or WordPerfect, please contact Wm. Andrew Schwartz, Managing Editor.

First proofs of articles will be sent to the authors for a careful proofing: only minor changes will be accepted at this stage: corrections should be confined to typographical errors. Manuscripts will not be returned by the editor. Authors of manuscripts accepted for publication will receive three copies of the issue in which their article is published.