Section II. An Alternative Vision:  Whitehead’s Philosophy

Track 5:  Whiteheadian Philosophy of Religion  
(John Quiring and Jea Sophia Oh)

 

This track will represent the achievement of Whiteheadian philosophy of religion and apply it to issues relevant to ecological civilization. This set of constraints involves identifying Whiteheadian priorities within both APA and AAR conceptions of philosophy of religion; then addressing Whiteheadian philosophy of religion concerns that arise within environmental studies, biophilosophy, environmental philosophy, environmental ethics, religion-and-ecology, eco-spirituality, and eco-theology.

 

Presenters

  • Roland Faber, Trees of Life: Rhizomatic vs. Arboreal Ecotheosis
  • Luke Higgins, Religion Beyond Bifurcation: Recovering the Role of Speculative and Empirical Experimentation in Religious Knowledge
  • Max Johnson, TBA
  • Richard Livingston, TBA
  • Derek Malone-France and John Baross, Process, Ecology, and Astrobiology: Life’s Future, On and Beyond Earth
  • Sam Mickey, A Place for Ecological Democracy in Whitehead’s Philosophy of Religious Entanglements
  • Les Muray, Process Thought and Naturalism
  • Jea Sophia Oh, An Ethic of “Robbery,” A Postcolonial Ecotheology of Seeds
  • Sheela Pawar, Imagining a Greener Social Union: Moving beyond Fear to an Ethic of Trust 
  • John Quiring, Gridlock and De-polarization in Philosophy of Religion and Political Ecology
  • Robert Smid, One Good Turn Serves Another: Comparative Philosophy as Companion to a ‘Greening’ of Philosophy of Religion
  • Anand Veeraraj, Transforming Axial Paradigms in Seizing an Ecological Civilization
  • Don Viney, Charles Hartshorne and the New Atheism
  • Anne Vroom, Hartshorne, Cobb and Keller in Dialogue with Zen Buddhism: Arguments For and Against Interdependence and Emptiness Respectively 

 

Schedule

Thursday: June 4, 2015

 

8:00 AM – 6:30 PM

Registration and Pre-Conference Activities: (Tours, etc.)

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Public Plenary: Bill McKibben, Climate Warming as a Civilizational Crisis

   

9:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Reception

   

 Friday: June 5, 2015

 

7:30 AM – 12 Noon

Late Registration

9:00 AM – 10:30 AM

Conference Plenary: John Cobb, Jr., A Whiteheadian Response to the Global Crisis

10:30 AM – 11 AM

Break: Refreshments

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM

Section Plenary: Helmut Maassen, Philosophy is not only for Philosophers

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM

Lunch Break

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

First Session—Greening Philosophy of Religion                                    Robert Smid, One Good Turn Serves Another: Comparative Philosophy as Companion to a ‘Greening’ of Philosophy of Religion

Les Muray: Process Thought and Naturalism

3:30 PM – 4:00 PM

Break: Refreshments

4:00 PM – 5:30 PM

Second Session—Critiques of Theism and Religion

 

Don Viney, Charles Hartshorne and the New Atheism

Anand Veeraraj, Transforming Axial Paradigms in Seizing an Ecological Civilization

5:30 PM – 7:00 PM

Dinner Break

7:00 PM – 8:30 PM

Public Plenary: Vandana ShivaThe Misuse of Science in the Global Crisis

8:30 PM – 9:30 PM

Reception

 Saturday, June 6, 2015:

 

9:00 AM – 10:30 AM

Conference Plenary: Herman Daly, Ecological Economics for an Ecological Civilization

10:30 AM – 11 AM

Break: Refreshments

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM

 Third Session: Astrobiology and Philosophy of Religion                   

Derek Malone-France and John Baross, Process, Ecology, and Astrobiology: Life’s Future, On and Beyond Earth

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM

Lunch Break

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

 Fourth Session: Theology and Philosophy of Religion

Richard Livingston, Whitehead and Latour

Jea Sophia Oh, An Ethic of “Robbery,” A Postcolonial Ecotheology of Seeds

3:30 PM – 4:00 PM

Break: Refreshments

4:00 PM – 5:30 PM

Fifth Session: Theology and Philosophy of Religion                     

Luke Higgins, Religion Beyond Bifurcation: Recovering the Role of Speculative and Empirical Experimentation in Religious Knowledge

 Roland Faber, Trees of Life: Rhizomatic vs. Arboreal Ecotheosis

5:30 PM – 7:00 PM

Dinner Break

7:00 PM – 8:30 PM

Public Plenary: Sheri Liao, Ecological Politics for an Ecological Civilization

8:30 PM – 9:30 PM

Reception

 Sunday, June 7, 2015:

 

9:00 AM – 10:30 AM

Conference Plenary: Wes Jackson, Ecological Agriculture for an Ecological Civilization

10:30 AM – 11 AM

Break: Refreshments

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM

Sixth Session: Zen and Integral Thought

 

Anne Vroom, Hartshorne, Cobb and Keller in Dialogue with Zen Buddhism: Arguments For and Against Interdependence and Emptiness Respectively 

Max Johnson, TBA

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM

Lunch Break

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

Seventh Session: Ecological Democracy

 

Sheela Pawar, Imagining a Greener Social Union: Moving beyond Fear to an Ethic of Trust 

Sam Mickey, A Place for Ecological Democracy in Whitehead’s Philosophy of Religious Entanglements                                         

3:30 PM – 4:00 PM

Break: Refreshments

4:00 PM – 5:30 PM

Eighth Session: Gridlock and De-polarization                                      John Quiring, Gridlock and De-polarization in Philosophy of Religion and Political Ecology                                                                                                      Group Discussion

6:00 PM – 8:30 PM

Banquet: David Griffin, The Whiteheadian Century!

 

Abstracts:

Roland Faber, Trees of Life: Rhizomatic vs. Arboreal Ecotheosis

The Tree of Life is an old and all-pervasive symbol for the connectivity of existence in all of its forms and shades. It indicates ecological consciousness within diverse religious traditions and may symbolize an ecotheosis, that is, a mutuality of wholeness in a divine horizon. Yet it might also be interpreted either as ecocentric or anthropocentric insofar as it implies an intricate dialectic of connectivity and awareness of its success or failure. Since according to Whitehead the sensible choice of symbolization will influence our ecological survival, Whitehead’s integration of consciousness with mutual immanence in a sense of peace might successfully use the symbol of the Tree of Life. For Deleuze, however, only the alternative rhizomatic symbolization of the chaosmos will avoid an anthropocentric failure of the tree-symbolism. Yet these alternatives are fluent and in such a way complimentary that they both will lead to a symbolization of an ecotheosis that can avoid the opposition of human exceptionalism or ecocentric reductionism without abandoning the role of eco-consciousness and eco-conscience.

 

Luke Higgins, Religion Beyond Bifurcation: Recovering the Role of Speculative and Empirical Experimentation in Religious Knowledge

For Whitehead, the incoherence of applying an entirely different epistemology to the supposedly “factual” sphere of nature’s materiality than is applied to the “value-seeking” enterprises of the human mind and culture – one that results in the “bifurcation” between matter and mind, objective primary qualities and subjective secondary qualities – leads to a kind of cultural schizophrenia that drastically “enfeebles” thought and “accounts for much that is half-hearted and wavering in our civilization.” In recent years much attention has been given to the implications of Whitehead’s critique of bifurcation for a re-envisioning of scientific knowledge (see in particular Isabelle Stengers and Bruno Latour). In this paper I suggest that Whitehead’s critical/constructive engagement with scientific knowledge shows strong parallels with his critical/constructive engagement with religious knowledge. More specifically, Whitehead’s method compels us to consider religious knowledge neither in internally subjective or externally supernatural terms – the two options bifurcation left it – but rather in speculative-empirical terms as a kind of care-driven encounter with the world’s otherness. Finally, I will explore the particular relevance of these insights for environmental ethics and eco-religious practice, suggesting that they may benefit from a less critical and more constructive, pragmatic focus on enabling experiences of adventurous becoming.

Max Johnson, TBA

Richard Livingston, TBA

Derek Malone-France and John Baross: Process, Ecology, and Astrobiology: Life’s Future, On and Beyond Earth

The burgeoning interdisciplinary field of astrobiology includes: (1) the study of the origins and evolution of life on Earth; (2) the search for life beyond Earth; and (3) consideration of the future of life, both on and beyond Earth. Process thought can make distinctive and important contributions to work in each of these three areas, and, in doing so, can foster richer, more adequate understandings of the moral and social implications of human space exploration and (ultimately) colonization, etc.

Given ongoing advances in both the theoretical knowledge and the technology necessary for the identification of habitable planets and the detection of signatures of life at inter-solar distances, many astrobiologists believe we could discover life beyond earth before the end of the current decade. Moreover, research in astrobiology has had, and continues to have, a significant impact on our understanding of terrestrial ecology, including global climate change and the issue of future earth habitability. Thus, questions regarding the natural and moral character, as well as the long-term sustainability, of our current ‘anthropocene’ epoch are squarely within the purview of astrobiological research and dialogue.

Our presentation will begin by offering a general conceptual framework for understanding astrobiology—as a highly interdisciplinary field that not only weaves together insights and approaches from all of the basic science and engineering disciplines, but also necessarily connects with the humanities, arts, and social sciences. We will, then, speak in concise terms about our own ongoing research in astrobiology, highlighting connections to be made with process thought. Finally, we will invite the audience to think with us about the various ways in which process philosophers, social theorists, scholars of religion, and theologians can help to shape both academic and public/popular thinking about astrobiology and its implications.

Sam Mickey, A Place for Ecological Democracy in Whitehead’s Philosophy of Religious Entanglements

In recent years, many scholars and activists have become increasingly engaged in efforts to understand the role of religion in the emergence of an ecologically oriented civilization. Whiteheadian contributions to the philosophy of religion provide effective means for taking up that task—criticizing otherworldly and anthropocentric tendencies in religion and reconstructing more ecologically conscious and conscientious functions of religion. By articulating religious phenomena as they are becoming or “in the making,” Whitehead and other process thinkers clarify the relational entanglement of aspects of religion that are often considered to be mutually exclusive opposites, such as transcendence/immanence, eternal/temporal, or God/world. That clarification of religious entanglements highlights the positive potential of religion to express “world-loyalty” and thus support harmonious relations between humans and the community of life on Earth. This paper presents a Whiteheadian philosophy of religious entanglements through an account of Whitehead’s recovery of Plato’s concept of the receptacle (hypodoche), that is, the place (chora) in which God and the world interpenetrate. Following an account of Whitehead’s critical reconstruction of the receptacle, I consider how Whitehead’s philosophy of religion supports an ecological democracy, which facilitates harmonious human-Earth relations.

Whitehead finds the account of the receptacle in Plato’s Timaeus to be helpful in elucidating the understanding of space-time in twentieth-century physics, yet he also criticizes the emanationism and dualism in Plato’s account. By reconstructing Plato’s receptacle, Whitehead posits a “community of locus,” that is, a network or “place” of internally interconnected entities. Along these lines, Whitehead extends his analysis to Leibniz, criticizing the interconnectedness that Leibniz’s God externally imposes on monads, and replacing it with the interconnectedness that internally relates monads to one another and to God in a community of locus. By situating God and the world in the dynamics of the receptacle, Whitehead undoes the omnipotence of God, so that the world is not subject to a transcendent monarchy but functions more like an ecological democracy, or in Whitehead’s terms, “a democracy of fellow creatures.” In such a democracy, no religion can claim the high ground of otherworldly transcendence, which is to say, no religion can escape the vicissitudes of place or bypass the participation of fellow creatures. Situated in the community of locus, religions are enjoined to participate democratically in the world. This entails multiple figures of entanglement, including interfaith cooperation (including orthodox and heterodox perspectives) as well as dialogue between religion and science. Furthermore, entangled in a democracy of creatures, religions are enjoined to facilitate harmonious relations at an ecological scale, which includes not only human-human or human-divine relations but also the full panoply of human-Earth relations. Noting that Whitehead’s writing is not explicit about all of the environmental and social challenges facing ecological civilization, I conclude by considering how Catherine Keller’s theopoetics of becoming extends Whitehead’s concept of the receptacle to a more comprehensive and inclusive vision of ecological civilization, which overcomes the logic of domination that underlies contemporary problems of rapacious consumption, environmental destruction, and social injustice (e.g., racism, sexism, poverty, and neocolonialism).

 

Les Muray, Process Thought and Naturalism TBA

Jea Sophia Oh, An Ethic of “Robbery,” A Postcolonial Ecotheology of Seeds

In recent years, genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have replaced our diet with genetically altered foods. A growing body of evidence connects GMOs with health problems, environmental damages, and violation of local communities. To talk about the problems of genetically modified organism (GMOs), this paper draws heavily on the Whiteheadian philosophy of organism. God is non-GMO but the Spiral (Process) of the entire organism(s). For Whitehead, the transforming power of nature is Creativity by which the Many and the One are correlated. This particular fact of togetherness among actual entities is a nexus. Animals and plants are organisms in which some of the groupings of actual occasions are in the form of entirely living nexus. This planet is a macro-cosmic organism in which all micro-cosmic organisms are biologically connected. The sacred organism(s) have been modified, distorted, damaged, and ill-transformed by the human occasions. Humans are not the center of the cosmos, instead every entity at the center of its own unique drama which should remain untouchable and irreducible by human interventions. The only justice is to stop GMOs from being produced. Otherwise, we (the interconnected organisms) will eventually become odd monsters through the process of bioaccumulation. Whitehead stated that life is “robbery.” The GM colonization of organism is the most merciless and unsympathetic robbery of all so far. This paper suggests a more sustainable and a less violent “robbery” as an ethic of “robbery” or a sustainable “robbery” although there is no way to justify and sanctify human being’s brutal colonization of the entire living planet (seeds, air, soil, water, plants, animals, and human beings) through the suicidal GM biotechnology.

  1. G: God the Farmer
  2. M: Monster Diaspora
  3. O: Organisms reverse
  4. S: Sustainable Robbery

Sheela Pawar, Imagining a Greener Social Union: Moving beyond Fear to an Ethic of Trust 

Thomas Hobbes linked the idea of fear as the glue of society to the notion of rights as a hedge against another’s ceaseless desire for power. But talk of fear and rights misconstrues basic relationships among human beings and between humans and animals. Examining basic relations of trust among humans provides a better picture of human relationships, whether based in faith or in a humanist belief in our common plight. These relationships can be extended, by the moral imagination, to animals, that is, to an idea of nature’s social union. It is hoped that focusing on trust and the fellowship of all creatures can provide an anecdote to paralyzing fear and provide a spur to social change.

 

John Quiring, Gridlock and Depolarization in Philosophy of Religion & Political Ecology

Environmental philosophy of religion—a three-way intersection—provides a transdisciplinary frame-work appropriate, perhaps, to the scale and complexity of climate change. This paper is prefaced with contributions of environmentalists, then applies philosophy of religion methods to the challenge of environmental polarizations and gridlock. It employs a “five-wave” notion of environmental history, seeing environmental pluralism and eco-pragmatism (5th wave) as integrating the 3rd wave (green technology, free-market environmentalism) with waves 1, 2, and 4 (conservation, preservation, leg-islation, and radical ecology). Greening can begin with and develop beyond any of the five.

The greening of philosophy of religion—seemingly in its infancy—arguably began when environmental-ists ventured natural theology and natural theodicy observations. But their assertions of the sacredness of Earth and threats to humanity and life are seen, by some, as “environmental religion,” in ‘apocalyptic’ “holy war” with “economic religion” by others who see traces of theology in economism with money as its god. Philosophy of religion methods can be proposed as applicable to this divide in science (natural vs. social) and technology (low vs. high). Both environmentalism and philosophy of religion are prone to conceptual narrowing, polarization, and gridlock, despite global and historical diversity and development integrated by third-way thinking. Process philosophers of religion, for example, cultivate complementary pluralism, finding a place for cosmic as well as theistic and acosmic religions and theologies. As they employ the notion of idolatry to test claims to ultimacy in religion, they also see ‘disciplinolatry’ in functional-equivalents of religion, including economism, technism, and ecologism.

As philosophy of religion addresses atheist/theist, science/religion, and exclusivist/pluralist polarizations, so environmental ethics can address social factors underlying competing paradigms of ecology and economics that, in turn, polarize ecophilosophies, future-scenarios, and policy on population, resources and climate-change. Transdisciplinary process philosophy of religion, employing the concepts of idolatry and functional-equivalents of religion, frames the deflation of economism and ecologism from secular fundamentalisms (of market and Earth) that reinforce Right/Left ideological polarization of environmental policy; even if a case for eco/econo asymmetry can be made by seeing the Earth as penultimate.

Robert Smid. One Good Turn Serves Another: Comparative Philosophy as Companion to a ‘Greening’ Philosophy of Religion.

Abstract: in this paper I examine the relationship–both historical and theoretical–between comparative philosophy of religion and the “greening” of philosophy of religion.  Along the way I defend three arguments: first, that contemporary philosophy of religion is, as a whole, necessarily comparative, even if it can still be practiced in some isolated forms within the confines of a single tradition; second, that this comparative turn has had a significant influence on the ecological turn in philosophy of religion; and, finally, that both developments stand to benefit to the extent that they recognize and further cultivate that relationship.

Anand Veeraraj, Transforming Axial Paradigms in Seizing an Ecological Civilization

This brief presentation is in line with the theme of this conference, “Seizing an Alternative: Toward an Ecological Civilization.”   What I wish to do here is to share the findings of my doctoral dissertation which I undertook under the guidance of John Cobb, David Griffin and my good friend, John Quiring who chairs this session, “The Threatening Catastrophe: Responding Now.” The dissertation was published as a book entitled, Green History of Religion.   Our study sought to show the root causes for the rise of, what Karl Jaspers calls, the “Axial Age” that rose during the first millennium BCE. A number of scholars of religions since Jaspers have sought to expand on Jaspers’ thesis and answer why and how the axial religions and philosophies developed without any concord with similar movements in diverse parts of the world. While every scholar sought to expound the phenomenon from their own academic expertise, no one offered a credible, all-encompassing rationale as to why axial movements developed in the first place. However, on one question these scholars were in agreement. It was around the idea of “human alienation from the world of nature” — a feature common to all axial religious traditions and philosophies. We sought to answer why this was so. Our enquiry led us to look at the broader planetary wide events that were in the offing during the millenniums preceding the rise of the axial age. Our findings showed that from about 12,000 BCE, the planet went through a warming trend which led to severe environmental disruptions all over the world. These environmental catastrophes spread rapidly and quickened the collapse of ancient civilizations. These catastrophes caused the breakdown of pre-axial human-world relations and contributed to the development of world-denying motifs that became the bedrock of almost all axial religious traditions and philosophies.

We concluded the volume, Green History of Religion with a call for a paradigm shift of all world-negating religious traditions and philosophies, especially the Christian faith by which we are informed. The study did not go on to propose the shape or the direction of the paradigm shift, much less how the shift may transform axial traditions. It was an unfinished project; and it makes our task all the more urgent. Of course that requires that we discard traditions that buttress human alienation from the world, and instead move toward world-affirming faiths that envision a common future in an ecological civilization. We need to cleanse our hearts and minds of all world-denying motifs which we unconsciously absorb from our axial ancestors without a demur. We are compelled to reject those world-denying dispositions found within our own traditions, especially the Protestant faith by which we are informed. And so we propose to address these squarely in this presentation as outlined below.

  1. The nature of axial revolution – a historical paradigm shift from pre-axial ways. How did the revolution come to sweep across the world giving rise to novel religious traditions and philosophies?
  2. The structure of axial revolution – What nefarious dispositions came to blight axial mindsets and philosophies?
  3. The structure of primal existence of the pre-axial times. What may we learn from the ecosensible ways of primal societies in helping us envision an ecological civilization?
  4. How can we work toward the transformation of axial mindset in preparation for the advent of an ecological civilization?

What would become apparent in this presentation is that we cannot envision a hopeful future for the Planet without a radical transformation of the world-negating motifs that lie at the heart of all World Religions. Our faith traditions and their cultural and ideological products have collectively brought this quandary upon contemporary human societies. We need transformed religious traditions to be at the center of the conversations and projects. Only religion can alleviate and fix these maladies and predicaments. If the underlying paradigms of our faiths and practices change for the better, they would transform our hearts and minds triggering seismic shifts of our social, political and religious institutions in moving us toward an Ecological Civilization. Religion is a big part of the solution and hope.

 

Donald Wayne Viney, Charles Hartshorne and the New Atheism

Charles Hartshorne died before the new atheism became a cultural phenomenon. Hartshorne died in 2000 at the age of 103 whereas the book that, arguably, launched the new atheism was Sam Harris’s The End of Faith, published in 2004. Hartshorne was a philosopher well versed in the sciences, having made modest contributions to both psychology and ornithology. His commitment to evolutionary science and to what he called neoclassical theism were unwavering. A hallmark of his approach to philosophy was a consistent and persistent attempt to engage with persons with whom he disagreed so as to find the most coherent philosophical views and the best arguments for them. Towards the end of his life, he wrote articles concerning the ideas about religious topics espoused by Carl Sagan, Steven Weinberg, and E. O. Wilson, scientists much admired by the new atheists. Hartshorne knew of an early article by Richard Dawkins but he was apparently unaware of Dawkins’ views on religion. An unfortunate lacuna in the works of the new atheists is that they do not mention Hartshorne, despite the fact that his work represents one of the most sustained and informed efforts of the twentieth century at constructing a philosophical theology closely attuned to the deliverances of science. This paper engages the new atheists in ways suggested by Hartshorne’s work so that the “new” atheism may be introduced to and challenged by a new (neoclassical) form of theism.

Anne Vroom, Hartshorne, Cobb and Keller in Dialogue with Zen Buddhism: Arguments For and Against Interdependence and Emptiness Respectively 

The notion of interdependence is of evident value for any ecological outlook on life. This paper aims to bring some clarity in the twentieth century dialogue with Zen Buddhism by means of historical-philosophical analysis of these dialogues. It particularly explores why Hartshorne, Cobb and Keller appreciate the Buddhist notion of interdependence and want to integrate this in Christianity, but do not want to incorporate the underlying notion of Emptiness. This paper systematizes the arguments that were raised in dialogue with Masao Abe (1915-2006) and brought these notions into dialogue with Christian theology. 

 

Charles Hartshorne was the first process thinker to dialogue with Masao Abe (1915-2006). John B. Cobb was the most enduring dialogue partner. Catherine Keller, more briefly, was also one of the sharpest partners in dialogue. Others who have participated (Chris Ives, Schubert Ogden, Marjorie Suchocki, Richard Rubinstein, Sandra Lubarsky) will not be engaged. This paper also critically evaluates the possibility and consequences of taking one (interdependence) without the other (emptiness). 

 

Bios

John Baross is a Professor in Oceanography and the Astrobiology Program at the University of Washington, also the NASA Astrobiology program. He specializes in the ecology, physiology, and taxonomy of microorganisms from hydrothermal vent environments, and the use of biochemical and molecular methods…. He is author or co-author of 25 scientific papers.

Roland Faber is the Kilsby Family/John B. Cobb, Jr. Professor of Process Studies at Claremont School of Theology, Professor of Religion and Philosophy at Claremont Graduate University, Executive Co-Director of the Center for Process Studies and the Founder and Executive Director of the Whitehead Reserch Project. Education : MA (Vienna), PhD (Vienna), Habilitation (Vienna). Fields of research and publication: Process Philosophy and Process Theology; (De)Constructive Theology; Poststructuralism (Gilles Deleuze); Transreligious Discourse (epistemology of Religious Relativity and Unity) and interreligious applications (e.g., Christianity/Buddhism); Comparative Philosophy of Religion (sources of Baha’i thought in Islamic philosophy in relation to Whitehead and Poststructuralism); Mysticism (Meister Eckhart, Nicolas of Cusa, Ibn Arabi). Theopoetics (an approach to post-structuralist and process theology, which addresses the liberating necessity of multiplicity). Books: The Divine Manifold (2014), The Allure of Things (2014), Beyond Superlatives (2014), Theopoetic Folds (2013), Butler on Whitehead (2012), Secrets of Becoming (2011), Beyond Metaphsics? (2011), Event and Decision (2010), God as Poet of the World (2008).

Luke B. Higgins received his doctorate from Drew University’s Graduate Division of Religion and currently teaches courses in philosophy and religion at South University and Armstrong State University in Savannah, Georgia.  Drawing on ecotheology, science studies, and the philosophies of Whitehead, Bergson and Deleuze, his dissertation proposes a constructive theological cosmology and cosmic Christology in which creaturely agencies and a divinely-permeated “trans-temporal” sphere mutually constitute one another. He has published a number of articles in which he draws Process theology into conversation with ecology, Continental philosophy and science studies.

Max Johnson is Field Marketing and Event Coordinator​ for Beanfields (“Vegan Fest,” “Gluten-Free Expo.”); also an Independent Scholar and Integral Theory facilitator.

Richard Livingston is a graduate student at Claremont Graduate University, IT Director at the Center for Process Studies, and Adjunct Instructor at Cal State Fullerton and Fullerton Community College.

Derek Malone-France is Associate Professor of Philosophy, of Religion, and of Writing, at the George Washington University, in Washington, DC. He is also founding Seminar Director for the Blumberg Dialogues in Astrobiology and Human Society at the John W. Kluge Center, at the US Library of Congress, and a Consultant to the Astrobiology Institute at the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) and the Lunar and Planetary Institute at the Universities Space Research Association. He is author of Deep Empiricism: Kant, Whitehead, and the Necessity of Philosophical Theism and Faith, Fallibility, and the Virtue of Anxiety: An Essay in Religion and Political Liberalism. He is also editor of Political Dissent—A Global Reader, Volume 1: Ancient to Early-Modern Sources and Volume 2: Modern Sources.

Sam Mickey is an adjunct professor in the Theology and Religious Studies department and the Environmental Studies program at the University of San Francisco. He has published variously on topics of environmental philosophy, postmodernism, phenomenology, and religion and ecology. He is the author of On the Verge of a Planetary Civilization: A Philosophy of Integral Ecology, and Whole Earth Thinking and Planetary Coexistence: Ecological Wisdom at the Intersection of Religion, Ecology, and Philosophy. He blogs at http://BecomingIntegral.com.

Les Muray is Professor of Philosophy and Religion at Curry College. He teaches Environmental Ethics; Religion and Science; Life Death, and Philosophy; Social and Political Philosophy; Religion and Ecology; and the Myth of the Hero. He is author of Liberal Protestantism and Science and An Introduction to the Process Understanding of Science, Society, and the Self. His 2006 Environmental Ethics class at Eötvös Lorand University was the first taught at a Hungarian University. 

Jea Sophia Oh is Assistant Professor of Asian Philosophy and Comparative Ethics at West Chester University of Pennsylvania. She has developed comparative postcolonial ecotheology in the area of constructive theology to combine her research areas of comparative theology, process theology, environmental ethics, postcolonialism, and feminism.  Her book, A Postcolonial Theology of Life: Planetarity East and West is the first approach to bridge postcolonialism and ecological theology with the use of Asian spirituality as the philosophical underpinning for the argument that all forms of Life are sacred.

Sheela Pawar is the author of Trusting Others, Trusting God: Concepts of Belief, Faith and Rationality ​ (Ashgate, 2009).  She received her doctorate in Philosophy of Religion and Theology from the Claremont Graduate University in 2002.  She currently teaches at California State University, Dominguez Hills and is a volunteer at the International Bird Rescue in San Pedro, California

John Quiring is an Adjunct Instructor in Philosophy at Victor Valley College and Program Director at the Center for Process Studies. He is author of “Philosophy of Religion, Functional-Equivalents of Religion, and Idolatry” (Forthcoming), and “New Atheist and Religionist Identity-Polarization as a Double-Bind for Process Thought.”

Robert Smid is Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religion at Curry College. He is author of Methodologies of Comparative Philosophy: The Pragmatist and Process Traditions.

Anand Veeraraj is an ordained minister of the Church of South India and served as a pastor for many years both in India and in the USA. He continues to serve as an honorary consultant for South Asian Ministries of the Presbytery of New Brunswick (PC-USA). He also works as the Research Director, Bellevue Hospital Center/New York University School of Medicine. He is the author of Green History of Religion and Earthen Vessels: The Paradox of Christian Leadership. He is an Eco-theologian. Anand and his wife Lilly live near Princeton, New Jersey.

Don Viney has been teaches philosophy and religion at Pittsburg State University in Kansas. He is the author of Charles Hartshorne and the Existence of God and A Brief Guide to Logic and Critical Thinking for Nonvulcans. Dr. Viney was honored with the 1989 Outstanding Faculty Award by the Student Government Association from the student nominees of faculty that demonstrate excellence in instruction and service to students on campus.

Anne Vroom is Assistant Professor in Comparative Philosophy of Religion, Religious Studies Program, Faculty of Theology at VU University Amsterdam where she teaches Eastern Thought and Nonviolent Inter-religious Dialogue. She has been a Visiting Professor at the Institute for Religious Studies and Interfaith Theology, University of Muenster and a Visiting Scholar at the Boston College Department for Comparative Theology and the Nanzan Institute for the Study of Religion and Culture, in Japan. She is currently a Center for Process Studies Visiting Scholar.